RAPE SEED AS

INGREDIENT IN FOODS

SEEDS FOR baking

Rape seeds are an excellent ingredient in many foods

Based on preliminary work by food enthusiasts (local produce) Knold & Top found that whole seeds from white flowering varieties (‘white’ varieties) taste milder as compared to seed from yellow flowering varieties (‘yellow’ varieties).

A pleasing taste, a pleasant chewing sensation together with increased  shelf life of many products make seeds from white varieties very attractive as an ingredient in breads, cakes, bars and other foods. Whole seeds from white varieties can be used like sunflower seeds, linseeds or sesame seeds in foods.

Healthy and nutritious

RAPE SEEDS

Rapeseeds are healthy as the oil composition is excellent; and the proteins have high biological value. The seeds are also rich sources of E-vitamins and plant sterols.

Rapeseeds contain glucosinolates. Glucosinolates (GL’s) can be converted to isothiocyanates by myrosinase, but this conversion is reduced because of the heat treatment during baking. We feel confident that max. 20 % rapeseed in foods together with the low content of GL’s in the seeds will not create health problems for humans. On the contrary small amounts of GLs are supposed to counteract some types of cancer, diabetes 2, inflammation of the body and other diseases.

EFSA Approval

’Novel Food’ approval

Today whole rapeseeds are not allowed for food use in the European Union. Foods not eaten ’to any significant degree’ in the European Union before April 1st, 1997 must obtain permission from EFSA (European Food Safety Authority) before they can be sold on the market.

Knold & Top ApS has submitted an application to the EFSA. We hope to obtain permission for whole seeds from white flowering rapeseed in 2020.

Energy per 100 g

2295 kJ/557 kcal

Total Fat
49 g
- Saturated Fat
4,2 g
- Monounsaturated Fat
4,4g
- Polyunsaturated Fat
15 g
Total Carbohydrate
0,0g
- Sugars
3,8 g
Dietary Fibers
24 g
Protein
17 g
Salt
0,0 g

Why is whole rapeseed not already used as food ingredient?

  • Glucosinolates. Some of those are harmful to animals when fed in large amounts. In original varieties before ca. 1980 the amounts of glucosinolates in the seed were larger than 90 μmoles/g seed, to day – regulated by the European Union - the levels of glucosinolates in the seed are below 18 μmoles/g seed.  
  • In North America most of current rapeseed varieties contain GMOs (genetic modified organisms). Food containing GMOs is not accepted by many consumers.
  • A penetrative taste ‘of rapeseed’ in food products.
  • Tiny

    RAPE SEEDS

  • WITH RAPE SEEDS

    RYEBREAD

  • PRODUCTS

    RAPE SEEDS

  • WITH RAPESEEDS

    RYEBREAD

  • READY TO USE

    RAPE SEEDS

  • MADE WITH RAPESEEDS

    RYEBREAD